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J Biol Chem. 2013 Jan 11;288(2):1114-24. doi: 10.1074/jbc.M112.417071. Epub 2012 Nov 21.

The neuroendocrine protein 7B2 suppresses the aggregation of neurodegenerative disease-related proteins.

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1
Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21201, USA.

Abstract

Neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer (AD) and Parkinson (PD) are characterized by abnormal aggregation of misfolded β-sheet-rich proteins, including amyloid-β (Aβ)-derived peptides and tau in AD and α-synuclein in PD. Correct folding and assembly of these proteins are controlled by ubiquitously expressed molecular chaperones; however, our understanding of neuron-specific chaperones and their involvement in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases is limited. We here describe novel chaperone-like functions for the secretory protein 7B2, which is widely expressed in neuronal and endocrine tissues. In in vitro experiments, 7B2 efficiently prevented fibrillation and formation of Aβ(1-42), Aβ(1-40), and α-synuclein aggregates at a molar ratio of 1:10. In cell culture experiments, inclusion of recombinant 7B2, either in the medium of Neuro-2A cells or intracellularly via adenoviral 7B2 overexpression, blocked the neurocytotoxic effect of Aβ(1-42) and significantly increased cell viability. Conversely, knockdown of 7B2 by RNAi increased Aβ(1-42)-induced cytotoxicity. In the brains of APP/PSEN1 mice, a model of AD amyloidosis, immunoreactive 7B2 co-localized with aggregation-prone proteins and their respective aggregates. Furthermore, in the hippocampus and substantia nigra of human AD- and PD-affected brains, 7B2 was highly co-localized with Aβ plaques and α-synuclein deposits, strongly suggesting physiological association. Our data provide insight into novel functions of 7B2 and establish this neural protein as an anti-aggregation chaperone associated with neurodegenerative disease.

PMID:
23172224
PMCID:
PMC3542996
DOI:
10.1074/jbc.M112.417071
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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