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Cardiol Young. 2013 Oct;23(5):717-21. doi: 10.1017/S1047951112001941. Epub 2012 Nov 21.

Motor training of sixty minutes once per week improves motor ability in children with congenital heart disease and retarded motor development: a pilot study.

Author information

1
Department of Pediatric Cardiology and Congenital Heart Disease, Deutsches Herzzentrum München, Germany. muellerjan@dhm.mhn.de

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Delay and impairment of motor development is reported in patients with congenital heart disease. This pilot study addressed the feasibility and effect of a low-dose motor training programme of 60 min once per week on motor ability in preschool children with congenital heart disease.

PATIENTS AND METHODS:

In all, 14 children--including four girls, in the age group of 4-6 years--with various types of congenital heart disease performed the motor developmental test MOT 4–6 before and after 3 months of a playful exercise programme of 60 min once a week.

RESULTS:

At baseline, the motor quotient ranged from normal to slightly impaired (median 92.0; Quartile 1: 83.75; Quartile 3: 101.25). After intervention, motor quotient did not change significantly for the entire group (95.0 (88.0, 102.5); p50.141). However, in the subgroup of nine children with retarded motor development at baseline (motor quotient lower 100), seven children had an improved motor quotient after 3 months of intervention. In this subgroup, motor quotient increased significantly (p50.020) by 5%.

CONCLUSIONS:

Overall, a short intervention programme of 60 min only once a week does not improve motor ability in all children with congenital heart disease. However, those with retarded motor development profit significantly from this low-dose intervention.

PMID:
23171628
DOI:
10.1017/S1047951112001941
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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