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Clin Infect Dis. 2012 Dec;55 Suppl 4:S271-93. doi: 10.1093/cid/cis762.

A systematic review and meta-analysis of the association between Giardia lamblia and endemic pediatric diarrhea in developing countries.

Author information

1
Center for Vaccine Development, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21201, USA. kmuhsen@medicine.umaryland.edu

Abstract

We performed a systematic literature review and meta-analysis examining the association between diarrhea in young children in nonindustrialized settings and Giardia lamblia infection. Eligible were case/control and longitudinal studies that defined the outcome as acute or persistent (>14 days) diarrhea, adjusted for confounders and lasting for at least 1 year. Data on G. lamblia detection (mainly in stools) from diarrhea patients and controls without diarrhea were abstracted. Random effects model meta-analysis obtained pooled odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Twelve nonindustrialized-setting acute pediatric diarrhea studies met the meta-analysis inclusion criteria. Random-effects model meta-analysis of combined results (9774 acute diarrhea cases and 8766 controls) yielded a pooled OR of 0.60 (95% CI, .38-.94; P = .03), indicating that G. lamblia was not associated with acute diarrhea. However, limited data suggest that initial Giardia infections in early infancy may be positively associated with diarrhea. Meta-analysis of 5 persistent diarrhea studies showed a pooled OR of 3.18 (95% CI, 1.50-6.76; P < .001), positively linking Giardia with that syndrome. The well-powered Global Enteric Multicenter Study (GEMS) is prospectively addressing the association between G. lamblia infection and diarrhea in children in developing countries.

PMID:
23169940
PMCID:
PMC3502312
DOI:
10.1093/cid/cis762
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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