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Eur J Clin Nutr. 2013 Jan;67(1):64-70. doi: 10.1038/ejcn.2012.178. Epub 2012 Nov 21.

Aged garlic extract reduces blood pressure in hypertensives: a dose-response trial.

Author information

1
Discipline of General Practice, The University of Adelaide, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia. karinried@niim.com.au

Abstract

BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES:

Hypertension affects about 30% of adults worldwide. Garlic has blood pressure-lowering properties and the mechanism of action is biologically plausible. Our trial assessed the effect, dose-response, tolerability and acceptability of different doses of aged garlic extract as an adjunct treatment to existing antihypertensive medication in patients with uncontrolled hypertension.

SUBJECTS/METHODS:

A total of 79 general practice patients with uncontrolled systolic hypertension participated in a double-blind randomised placebo-controlled dose-response trial of 12 weeks. Participants were allocated to one of three garlic groups with either of one, two or four capsules daily of aged garlic extract (240/480/960 mg containing 0.6/1.2/2.4 mg of S-allylcysteine) or placebo. Blood pressure was assessed at 4, 8 and 12 weeks and compared with baseline using a mixed-model approach. Tolerability was monitored throughout the trial and acceptability was assessed at 12 weeks by questionnaire.

RESULTS:

Mean systolic blood pressure was significantly reduced by 11.8±5.4 mm Hg in the garlic-2-capsule group over 12 weeks compared with placebo (P=0.006), and reached borderline significant reduction in the garlic-4-capsule group at 8 weeks (-7.4±4.1 mm Hg, P=0.07). Changes in systolic blood pressure in the garlic-1-capsule group and diastolic blood pressure were not significantly different to placebo. Tolerability, compliance and acceptability were high in all garlic groups (93%) and highest in the groups taking one or two capsules daily.

CONCLUSIONS:

Our trial suggests aged garlic extract to be an effective and tolerable treatment in uncontrolled hypertension, and may be considered as a safe adjunct treatment to conventional antihypertensive therapy.

PMID:
23169470
PMCID:
PMC3561616
DOI:
10.1038/ejcn.2012.178
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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