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Transplantation. 2012 Nov 27;94(10):1052-9. doi: 10.1097/TP.0b013e31826c3915.

A report of 15 hand allotransplantations in 12 patients and their outcomes in China.

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1
Department of Orthopaedic Surgery of Xijing Hospital, The Fourth Military Medical University, No. 15 West Changle Road, Xi’an, Shaanxi, China. nfperry@163.com

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Limb allotransplantation is emerging as a promising solution to the loss of a limb with the development of advanced surgical techniques and new, highly effective immunosuppressive agents.

METHODS:

We retrospectively reviewed the records of 15 hand allotransplantations in 12 patients in China which were performed from September 1999 to May 2008.

RESULTS:

In total, there were 1 bilateral and 5 unilateral hand transplantations, 3 unilateral and 2 bilateral forearm transplantations, and 1 palm and 1 thumb transplantation. The average age of recipients was 34 ± 11.3 years (range, 19-52 years). At 1-year follow-up, all grafts were viable and with good function. Of the 15 hands transplanted, 8 are currently viable (mean follow-up, 52 ± 36.3 months; range, 16-112 months), including all 3 bilateral cases. Reasons for graft failure were rejection and failure of compliance with immunosuppressive therapy.

CONCLUSIONS:

Long-term survival of hand transplantation with appropriate immunosuppression is feasible, and satisfactory functional results have been achieved. Careful pretransplant psychologic and social evaluation, consideration of the financial burden of long-term immunosuppressive medications, and close multispecialty collaboration is critical for good outcomes. Limb rejection was related with immunosuppression use. Further study and experience is required before hand allotransplantation can become a generally recommended treatment.

PMID:
23169225
DOI:
10.1097/TP.0b013e31826c3915
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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