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Dermatitis. 2012 Nov-Dec;23(6):258-68. doi: 10.1097/DER.0b013e318273a3b8.

Occupational contact dermatitis in hairdressers/cosmetologists: retrospective analysis of north american contact dermatitis group data, 1994 to 2010.

Author information

1
Department of Dermatology, Veterans Affairs Medical Center, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55417, USA. erin.warshaw@va.gov

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

European studies document that occupational contact dermatitis (CD) is common in hairdressers, but studies from North America are lacking.

OBJECTIVES:

The objectives of this study were to estimate the prevalence of occupational CD among North American hairdressers/cosmetologists (HD/CS) and to characterize responsible allergens and irritants as well as their sources.

METHODS:

A cross-sectional analysis of patients patch tested by the North American Contact Dermatitis Group between 1994 and 2010 was conducted.

RESULTS:

Of 35,842 patients, 432 (1.2%) were HD/CS. Significantly, most of the HD/CS were female (89.8%) and younger than 40 years (55.6%) as compared with non-hairdressers (P < 0.0001). The rates for allergic and irritant CD in HD/CS were 72.7% and 37.0%, respectively. The most common body site of involvement was the hand, and this was significantly more common than in non-HD/CS (P < 0.0001). The most frequent currently relevant and occupationally related allergens were glyceryl thioglycolate, p-phenylenediamine, nickel sulfate, 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate, and quaternium-15. Hair dyes, permanent wave solutions, and other hair products were common sources of allergens. The North American Contact Dermatitis Group allergen series missed at least 1 occupationally-related allergen in 26.2% of patients.

CONCLUSIONS:

Contact dermatitis in North American HD/CS is common, and occupationally related allergens are those found in HD/CS products. Supplemental hairdressing/cosmetology antigen series are important in detecting all occupationally related allergens in this population.

PMID:
23169207
DOI:
10.1097/DER.0b013e318273a3b8
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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