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Nutr Hosp. 2012 Jul-Aug;27(4):1120-6. doi: 10.3305/nh.2012.27.4.5848.

[Delay in the acquisition of sucking-swallowing-breathing in the preterm; efects of early stimulation].

[Article in Spanish]

Author information

1
Sección de Gastroenterología y Nutrición Pediátrica, Servicio de Pediatría, Hospital Universitario de Getafe, Getafe, Madrid, España. e_o_izquierdo@yahoo.es

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

Premature baby's oral feeding is not possible until the reflex of sucking-swallowing-breathing adquisition. Its delay extends hospital stay and increases the incidence of oral motor disorders in early childhood.

AIMS:

To analyze the transition from enteral to oral nutrition, the comorbidity associated with its delay and the impact of an early suction stimulation in a cohort of premature babies.

PATIENTS AND METHODS:

Retrospective checking of 95 infants less than 32 gestation weeks (GW) admitted to a neonatal ICU in the last 4 years. It was revised the gestational age, anthropometric at birth and discharge, comorbidity, duration of mechanical ventilation, oxygen requirements, time of beginning and end of enteral/oral nutrition, beginning of Kangaroo method and the suction stimulation and the daily weight gain average.

RESULTS:

Suction stimulation began between weeks 29 and 40 GW (average and median 32 GW). Oral nutrition was initiated between 31-40 GW (average and median 33 GW) and completed between 33-44 GW (average and median 35 GW). Oral nutrition was delayed in patients who required longer mechanical ventilation and oxygen therapy. There was a positive correlation between the beginning of suction stimulation and the time of acquisition of a complete oral nutrition (84% Spearman correlation test) and length of hospital stay (80% Spearman correlation test).

CONCLUSIONS:

[corrected] Early suction stimulation in a preterm patient seems to facilitate full oral nutrition at an early stage and it is associated with a hospital stay decrease and the improvement in the daily weight gain average.

PMID:
23165551
DOI:
10.3305/nh.2012.27.4.5848
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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