Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
In Vivo. 2012 Nov-Dec;26(6):993-9.

In search of new biological activities of isolates from Odontoglossum Harvengtense 'Tutu'.

Author information

1
Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Josai University, Sakado, Saitama, Japan.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

In the current study, we isolated four known compounds, two phenanthrenes, 2,5-dihydroxy-4,9-dimethoxy phenanthrene [1] and 4-methoxyphenanthrene-2,7-diol (flavanthrinin) [2], one phenanthrenequinone, 5-hydroxy-2,3-dimethoxy-1,4-phenanthrenequinone [3], and one flavone, 3,5,7-trihydroxyflavone (galangin) [4], from the ethyl acetate (EtOAc) extract of Odontoglossum Harvengtense 'Tutu' through bioassay-guided fractionation, and investigated their biological activities.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

The isolated compounds were identified with spectroscopic analysis and through comparison to literature values. Cytotoxic activity towards human tumor and normal cells was determined by the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) method. Nitric oxide (NO) was determined by the Griess method. Radical scavenging activity was determined by electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy. Osteoclastogenesis was monitored by tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) activity.

RESULTS:

The compounds had slightly higher cytotoxicity towards human oral squamous cell carcinoma and leukemia cell lines as compared with human normal oral cells, yielding a tumor specificity value of 1.1-2.7. Among these four compounds, 1 most potently inhibited the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated NO production and the receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL)-stimulated osteoclastogenesis by mouse macrophage-like RAW264.7 cells. Micromolar concentrations of 1 scavenged the NO radical produced from 1-hydroxy-2-oxo-3-(N-3-methyl-3-aminopropyl)-3-methyl-1-triazene.

CONCLUSION:

The present study demonstrated, for the first time, that 1 inhibited both macrophage activation and osteoclast differentiation, suggesting its possible anti-inflammatory action.

PMID:
23160683
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for HighWire
    Loading ...
    Support Center