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Clin J Sport Med. 2013 Jan;23(1):33-8. doi: 10.1097/JSM.0b013e3182717983.

Practice injury rates in collegiate sports.

Author information

  • 1Department of Orthopaedic Surgery and Sports Medicine, Harborview Medical Center, Seattle, WA, USA. bagel@u.washington.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The objective of this article was to explore the differences in practice injury rates for select National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) sports within and across sport by preseason, in-season, and postseason. This article will explore the relationship of practice injury rates by fall, winter, and spring sports as well as by Divisions I, II, and III.

DESIGN:

Descriptive epidemiology study.

SETTING:

NCAA schools.

PATIENTS:

NCAA athletes.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Injury.

RESULTS:

In all sports across all seasons, preseason practice injury rates [6.3 per 1000 athletic exposure (A-E)] were higher than in-season (2.3 per 1000 A-E). Fall sports had an overall preseason practice injury rate of 7.4 (per 1000 A-E) compared with 7.0 (per 1000 A-E) for winter and 3.5 (per 1000 A-E) for spring sports. Women's soccer had the highest preseason injury rate of 9.5 (per 1000 A-E). Men's football had the highest increased risk of injury comparing preseason with in-season practice injury (3.47 per 1000 A-E).

CONCLUSIONS:

The recognition that preseason practice injury rates are higher compared with in-season and postseason practice injury rates can create an opportunity for athletes, coaches, and medical personnel to identify prevention strategies to reduce preseason injury risk.

PMID:
23160274
DOI:
10.1097/JSM.0b013e3182717983
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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