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Clin Pediatr (Phila). 2013 Jan;52(1):54-61. doi: 10.1177/0009922812465943. Epub 2012 Nov 14.

Outcomes of children treated with tracheostomy and positive-pressure ventilation at home.

Author information

1
University of Alabama-Birmingham, Birmingham, AL, USA. comgulnur@uams.edu

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Long-term outcomes for children who survive on tracheostomy and positive-pressure ventilation (TPPV) at home are not well known.

METHODS:

A retrospective review of 20 years of clinical data at a single institution was performed. Outcome measures included 5-year survival, decannulation rate, and neurocognition.

RESULTS:

A total of 91 children were categorized under neuromotor dysfunction (52%), chronic lung disease (29%), and congenital anomalies (20%). The 5-year survival rates for these categories were 89% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 80%-99%), 76% (95% CI = 57%-100%), and 94% (95% CI = 83%-100%), respectively. Overall, the 5-year decannulation rate was 25% (95% CI = 14%-35%), with children with chronic lung disease having the highest rate (51%). It was found that 14% were extremely delayed in neurocognition.

CONCLUSION:

Most children on TPPV at home survive beyond 5 years, and a significant number are decannulated. Primary care physicians and communities should be prepared to accommodate the increasing number of children on TPPV at home.

PMID:
23155195
DOI:
10.1177/0009922812465943
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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