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Cell Med. 2012;4(1):1-11. Epub 2012 Jan 1.

Comparative Analysis of the Immunomodulatory Properties of Equine Adult-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells().

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1
Department of Pathology, Microbiology, and Immunology, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA, USA.

Abstract

Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) derived from bone marrow (BM), adipose tissue (AT), umbilical cord blood (CB), and umbilical cord tissue (CT) are increasingly being used to treat equine inflammatory and degenerative lesions. MSCs modulate the immune system in part through mediator secretion. Animal species and MSC tissue of origin are both important determinants of MSC function. In spite of widespread clinical use, how equine MSCs function to heal tissues is fully unknown. In this study, MSCs derived from BM, AT, CB, and CT were compared for their ability to inhibit lymphocyte proliferation and secrete mediators in response to activation. Five MSC lines from each tissue were isolated. Lymphocyte proliferation was assessed in a mixed leukocyte reaction, and mediator secretion was determined by ELISA. Regardless of tissue of origin, quiescent MSCs did not alter lymphocyte proliferation or secrete mediators, except for transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β1). When stimulated, MSCs of all tissue types decreased lymphocyte proliferation, increased prostaglandin (PGE(2)) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) secretion, and decreased production of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interferon-γ (IFN-γ). BM-MSCs and CB-MSCs also produced nitric oxide (NO), while AT-MSCs and CT-MSCs did not. Equine MSCs did not produce indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO). These data suggest that activated equine MSCs derived from BM, AT, CT, and CB secrete high concentration of mediators and are similar to MSCs from rodents and humans in their immunomodulatory profiles. These findings have implication for the treatment of inflammatory lesions dominated by activated lymphocytes and TNF-α and IFN-γ in vivo.

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