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J Anim Sci. 2013 Apr;91(4):1582-93. doi: 10.2527/jas.2012-5787. Epub 2012 Nov 12.

Cell Biology Symposium: feed efficiency: mitochondrial function to global gene expression.

Author information

1
Department of Poultry Science, Center of Excellence for Poultry Science, Division of Agriculture, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville 72701, USA. wbottje@uark.edu

Abstract

Understanding the cellular basis of feed efficiency (FE) is instrumental to helping poultry and livestock industries continue to provide high-quality protein for an increasingly crowded world. To understand relationships of FE and gene expression, global RNA transcription was investigated in breast muscle obtained from a male broiler line fed the same diet and individually phenotyped for FE. In these studies, RNA samples obtained from broilers that exhibited either high FE (0.65 ± 0.01) or low FE (0.46 ± 0.01) were analyzed with an Agilent 44K chicken oligoarray. A 1.3-fold cutoff in expression (30% difference between groups) resulted in 782 genes that were differentially expressed (P < 0.05) in muscle between the high- and low-FE phenotypes. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis, an online software program, was used to identify genes, gene networks, and pathways associated with the phenotypic expression of FE. The results indicate that the high-FE phenotype exhibited increased expression of genes associated with 1) signal transduction pathways, 2) anabolic activities, and 3) energy-sensing and energy coordination activities, all of which would likely be favorable to cell growth and development. In contrast, the low-FE broiler phenotype exhibited upregulation of genes 1) associated with actin-myosin filaments, cytoskeletal architecture, and muscle fibers and 2) stress-related or stress-responsive genes. Because the low-FE broiler phenotype exhibits greater oxidative stress, it would appear that the low-FE phenotype is the product of inherent gene expression that is modulated by oxidative stress. The results of these studies begin to provide a comprehensive picture of gene expression in muscle, a major organ of energy demand in an animal, associated with phenotypic expression of FE.

PMID:
23148240
DOI:
10.2527/jas.2012-5787
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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