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J Endod. 2012 Dec;38(12):1570-7. doi: 10.1016/j.joen.2012.08.013. Epub 2012 Oct 12.

Association among oral health, apical periodontitis, CD14 polymorphisms, and coronary heart disease in middle-aged adults.

Author information

1
Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Turin, Turin, Italy. damiano.pasqualini@unito.it

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

There is evidence to suggest that an association exists between oral infections and coronary heart disease (CHD). Subjects presenting lesions of endodontic origin (LEOs) or pulpal inflammation had an increased risk of developing CHD. However, findings concerning systemic manifestations of apical periodontitis (AP) remain controversial. An association between CD14 gene polymorphisms and atherosclerosis-associated diseases has been shown, but there are no data regarding an association between CD14 polymorphism and AP. This study evaluated associations between clinical oral health status, CD14 polymorphisms, and CHD.

METHODS:

A case-controlled clinical trial was designed to compare middle-aged adults with acute myocardial infarction or unstable angina (n = 51) within 12 months of the acute event defined as first manifestation with healthy controls (n = 49). Participants were matched for age, sex, and socioeconomic status. Indicators of oral disease and compliance were evaluated. CD14 polymorphisms were analyzed by restriction fragment length polymorphism-polymerase chain reaction.

RESULTS:

CHD subjects had a higher prevalence of oral diseases and lower compliance to oral preventive strategies than healthy controls. Multivariate analysis showed a positive association between missing teeth (odds ratio [OR] = 1.37; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.02-1.85), the number of LEOs (OR = 4.37; 95% CI, 1.69-11.28), chronic periodontitis (OR = 5.87; 95% CI, 1.17-29.4), and CHD. No statistically significant association emerged between the CD14 C(-260)T and the CD14 C(-159)T polymorphism, endodontic or periodontal disease, and CHD.

CONCLUSIONS:

Chronic oral diseases may increase the risk of CHD and may be an unconventional risk factor for CHD.

PMID:
23146639
DOI:
10.1016/j.joen.2012.08.013
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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