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Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol. 2012 Dec;33(12):1207-12. doi: 10.1086/668421. Epub 2012 Oct 23.

Incidence, secular trends, and outcomes of prosthetic joint infection: a population-based study, olmsted county, Minnesota, 1969-2007.

Author information

1
Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, USA. gtsaras@uic.edu

Abstract

CONTEXT:

The epidemiology of prosthetic joint infection (PJI) in a population-based cohort has not been studied in the United States.

OBJECTIVES:

To provide an accurate assessment of the true incidence, secular trends, clinical manifestations, microbiology, and treatment outcomes of PJI in a population-based cohort.

DESIGN:

Historical cohort study.

SETTING:

Olmsted County, Minnesota.

PARTICIPANTS:

Residents who underwent total knee arthroplasty (TKA) or total hip arthroplasty (THA) between January 1, 1969, and December 31, 2007.

METHODS:

Incidence rates and trends in PJI were assessed using the Kaplan-Meier method and log-rank test, as were treatment outcomes among PJI case patients.

RESULTS:

A total of 7,375 THAs or TKAs were implanted in residents of Olmsted County during the study period. Seventy-five discrete joints in 70 individuals developed PJI, during a mean ± SD follow-up of [Formula: see text] years. The cumulative incidence of PJI was 0.5%, 0.8%, and 1.4% after 1, 5, and 10 years after arthroplasty, respectively. Overall, the rate of survival free of clinical failure after treatment of PJI was 76.8% (95% confidence interval [CI], 64.3-85.2) and 65.2% (95% CI, 33.1-76.2) at 3 and 5 years, respectively. The incidence and treatment outcomes did not significantly differ by decade of implantation, patient age at implantation, gender, or joint location.

CONCLUSIONS:

The incidence of PJI is relatively low in a population-based cohort and is a function of age of the prosthesis. Incidence trends and outcomes have not significantly changed over the past 40 years.

PMID:
23143357
PMCID:
PMC3602045
DOI:
10.1086/668421
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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