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J Atten Disord. 2015 Jul;19(7):569-77. doi: 10.1177/1087054712461689. Epub 2012 Nov 9.

Variations in Physician Attitudes Regarding ADHD and Their Association With Prescribing Practices.

Author information

1
Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, MA, USA Tufts Medical Center, Boston, MA, USA rsheldrick@tuftsmedicalcenter.org.
2
Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, MA, USA Tufts Medical Center, Boston, MA, USA.
3
Tufts Medical Center, Boston, MA, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The objective of this study was to test whether physicians' attitudes regarding the impact of ADHD on health-related quality of life (HRQL) explain differences in practices for prescribing psychostimulants in children.

METHOD:

In a cross-sectional survey, U.S.-based pediatricians and psychiatrists ("physicians") used the Paper-Standard Gamble--a widely used preference-based assessment of HRQL--to rate four vignettes describing ADHD health states of varying severity. Associations between standard gamble scores and questions about prescribing practices were analyzed using ordinal logistic regression.

RESULTS:

Surveys were mailed to 291 physicians; 127 (44%) returned complete forms. Lower standard gamble scores were associated with more emphasis on children's ADHD symptoms (p = .03) and less emphasis on parents' concerns about stimulant side effects (p = .03) when prescribing psychostimulants.

CONCLUSION:

Differences in physician perceptions of the severity of ADHD symptoms and in their emphasis on parental concerns about side effects may help explain variations in ADHD psychostimulant prescription patterns.

KEYWORDS:

ADHD; quality of life; standard gamble; utility

PMID:
23142852
PMCID:
PMC3994174
DOI:
10.1177/1087054712461689
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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