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DNA Repair (Amst). 2013 Jan 1;12(1):27-37. doi: 10.1016/j.dnarep.2012.10.003. Epub 2012 Nov 9.

A non-catalytic function of Rev1 in translesion DNA synthesis and mutagenesis is mediated by its stable interaction with Rad5.

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1
Graduate Center for Toxicology, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536, USA.

Abstract

DNA damage tolerance consisting of template switching and translesion synthesis is a major cellular mechanism in response to unrepaired DNA lesions during replication. The Rev1 pathway constitutes the major mechanism of translesion synthesis and base damage-induced mutagenesis in model cell systems. Rev1 is a dCMP transferase, but additionally plays non-catalytic functions in translesion synthesis. Using the yeast model system, we attempted to gain further insights into the non-catalytic functions of Rev1. Rev1 stably interacts with Rad5 (a central component of the template switching pathway) via the C-terminal region of Rev1 and the N-terminal region of Rad5. Supporting functional significance of this interaction, both the Rev1 pathway and Rad5 are required for translesion synthesis and mutagenesis of 1,N(6)-ethenoadenine. Furthermore, disrupting the Rev1-Rad5 interaction by mutating Rev1 did not affect its dCMP transferase, but led to inactivation of the Rev1 non-catalytic function in translesion synthesis of UV-induced DNA damage. Deletion analysis revealed that the C-terminal 21-amino acid sequence of Rev1 is uniquely required for its interaction with Rad5 and is essential for its non-catalytic function. Deletion analysis additionally implicated a C-terminal region of Rev1 in its negative regulation. These results show that a non-catalytic function of Rev1 in translesion synthesis and mutagenesis is mediated by its interaction with Rad5.

PMID:
23142547
DOI:
10.1016/j.dnarep.2012.10.003
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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