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J Maxillofac Oral Surg. 2009 Jun;8(2):121-6. doi: 10.1007/s12663-009-0030-y. Epub 2009 Aug 11.

Osteoporosis and oral bone resorption: a review.

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1
Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, Shahid Sadoughi University of Medical Sciences, Yazd, Iran ; Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, Faculty of Dentistry Shahid Sadoughi, Univesity of Medical Sciences, Daheh Fajr Boulevard, Emam Street, Yazd, Iran.

Abstract

This paper is a summary of the published studies on the possible association between osteoporosis and alveolar bone loss. Osteoporosis and low bone mass are considered as a major public health problem. The mandible like other bones of the body has a series of anatomical landmarks that can serve as radiographic indicators. Using these indicators it is possible to evaluate changes in bone with respect to its quantity or quality by different methods of taking images. Higher bone resorption was detected in women with a higher number of pregnancies. Also, the higher educated the patient, the less bone resorption. Women with a background of backaches had more bone resorption to those who did not have this backache background. Finally, it was recognized that it would be possible to clear the quality dimension of the process of mandibular bone resorption. If we can identify the osteoporotic process using a basic panoramic radiography measurement technique, then it is possible to intercept the progress of the disease through early warning and treatment. From the results of this study, it can be concluded the thickness of the mandibular angular cortex can be used as an index for bone resorption. A healthy lifestyle has multiple benefits for the mouth and throughout the body. Dental professionals can play a role in preventing osteoporosis by reinforcing this message.

KEYWORDS:

Bone resorption; Oral Bone; Osteoporosis

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