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J Psychosom Res. 1990;34(1):71-7.

The relationship between situational stress and phantom limb pain: cross-lagged correlational data from six month pain logs.

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1
Biofeedback and Psychophysiological Disorders Clinic, Psychology Service, Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Augusta, GA 30910.

Abstract

This study reports the results of the first investigation into the relationship between situational stress and phantom limb pain. Twenty-seven male amputees recorded their pain and overall stress levels daily for 180 days using a 1-10 rating scale. Three possible relationships into the etiology and/or maintenance of phantom limb pain were examined using cross-lagged correlational techniques: an isomorphic relationship (same time increases in pain lead to same time increases in stress and vice versa), a consequence relationship (increases in pain precede increases in stress), and a precursor relationship (increases in stress precede increases in pain). Thirty-seven per cent of subjects demonstrated some significant precursor relationship. Although support was found for all three hypotheses, the most frequently observed relationship was the isomorphic one. Seventy-four per cent of subjects demonstrated some significant stress-pain relationship. The results lend support to the psychological theory underlying the use of psychophysiological interventions such as biofeedback and relaxation therapy in amputees with phantom limb pain.

PMID:
2313614
DOI:
10.1016/0022-3999(90)90009-s
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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