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Nat Med. 2012 Nov;18(11):1630-8. doi: 10.1038/nm.2988. Epub 2012 Nov 7.

Chromoanagenesis and cancer: mechanisms and consequences of localized, complex chromosomal rearrangements.

Author information

1
Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research and Department of Cellular and Molecular Medicine, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA, USA. a1holland@ucsd.edu

Abstract

Next-generation sequencing of DNA from human tumors or individuals with developmental abnormalities has led to the discovery of a process we term chromoanagenesis, in which large numbers of complex rearrangements occur at one or a few chromosomal loci in a single catastrophic event. Two mechanisms underlie these rearrangements, both of which can be facilitated by a mitotic chromosome segregation error to produce a micronucleus containing the chromosome to undergo rearrangement. In the first, chromosome shattering (chromothripsis) is produced by mitotic entry before completion of DNA replication within the micronucleus, with a failure to disassemble the micronuclear envelope encapsulating the chromosomal fragments for random reassembly in the subsequent interphase. Alternatively, locally defective DNA replication initiates serial, microhomology-mediated template switching (chromoanasynthesis) that produces local rearrangements with altered gene copy numbers. Complex rearrangements are present in a broad spectrum of tumors and in individuals with congenital or developmental defects, highlighting the impact of chromoanagenesis on human disease.

PMID:
23135524
PMCID:
PMC3616639
DOI:
10.1038/nm.2988
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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