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J Biomed Biotechnol. 2012;2012:473712. doi: 10.1155/2012/473712. Epub 2012 Oct 14.

Production of adenosine by ectonucleotidases: a key factor in tumor immunoescape.

Author information

1
INSERM U866, Faculté de Médecine, Université de Bourgogne, Dijon, France. fghiringhelli@cgfl.fr

Abstract

It is now well known that tumor immunosurveillance contributes to the control of cancer growth. Many mechanisms can be used by cancer cells to avoid the antitumor immune response. One such mechanism relies on the capacity of cancer cells or more generally of the tumor microenvironment to generate adenosine, a major molecule involved in antitumor T cell response suppression. Adenosine is generated by the dephosphorylation of extracellular ATP released by dying tumor cells. The conversion of ATP into adenosine is mediated by ectonucleotidase molecules, namely, CD73 and CD39. These molecules are frequently expressed in the tumor bed by a wide range of cells including tumor cells, regulatory T cells, Th17 cells, myeloid cells, and stromal cells. Recent evidence suggests that targeting adenosine by inhibiting ectonucleotidases may restore the resident antitumor immune response or enhance the efficacy of antitumor therapies. This paper will underline the impact of adenosine and ectonucleotidases on the antitumor response.

PMID:
23133312
PMCID:
PMC3481458
DOI:
10.1155/2012/473712
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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