Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Indian Dermatol Online J. 2012 Jan;3(1):17-20. doi: 10.4103/2229-5178.93486.

Clinicoepidemiological study of pigmented purpuric dermatoses.

Author information

1
Department of Dermatology and Venereology, Institute of Medical Sciences, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi, Uttar Pradesh, India.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Pigmented purpuric dermatoses (PPD) are a group of vascular disorders with varied manifestations which cause concern and are resistant to treatment. The literature is still lacking in clinicoepidemiological studies.

AIM:

To study the epidemiology, etiological, host and environmental factors, clinical manifestations, its variations, and the type prevalent in this part of the world.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

All cases of PPD were selected for the study from Skin and Venereal Disease, Out Patient Department between January 2008 and June 2009. Their history, examination, hematological investigations, and, in a few, histopathology findings were also recorded and data obtained were evaluated statistically.

RESULTS:

There were 100 cases of PPD of total 55 323 patients (0.18%). There were 79 males and 21 females between 11 and 66 years. They were working as police men, security guards, barber, chemist, teachers, students, farmers, businessmen, and housewives. In a majority, there was a history of prolonged standing in day-to-day work. Purpuric, brownish pigmented, lichenoid or atrophic lesions were seen depending upon the type of PPD on lower parts of one or both lower limbs. Blood investigations were normal. Schamberg's disease was seen in ninety five, Lichen aureus in three, lichenoid dermatosis and Majocchi's disease in one case each.

DISCUSSION:

Three clinical types of PPD were diagnosed which may represent different features of the same disease. Cell-mediated immunity, immune complexes, capillary fragility, gravitational forces, venous hypertension, focal infection, clothing, contact allergy to dyes, and drug intake have been incriminating factors in the past. Patient's occupation and environmental factors may also be considered contributory in precipitating the disease.

CONCLUSIONS:

The study revealed the problem of PPD in this geographical area, its magnitude, clinical presentation, the type prevalent, and possible aggravating factors to be kept in mind while managing the disease.

KEYWORDS:

Aggravating factors; clinicoepidemiological study; pigmented purpuric dermatoses

PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Medknow Publications and Media Pvt Ltd Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Support Center