Format

Send to

Choose Destination
J Antimicrob Chemother. 2013 Mar;68(3):569-72. doi: 10.1093/jac/dks427. Epub 2012 Nov 5.

Voluntary ban on cephalosporin use in Danish pig production has effectively reduced extended-spectrum cephalosporinase-producing Escherichia coli in slaughter pigs.

Author information

1
Research Group of Bacterial Genomics and Antimicrobial Resistance, National Food Institute, Technical University of Denmark, Kemitorvet build. 204, 2800 Lyngby, Denmark. yvoa@food.dtu.dk

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To measure the effect of a voluntary ban on cephalosporin usage in the Danish pig production on the prevalence of extended-spectrum cephalosporinase (ESC)-producing Escherichia coli in pigs and pork.

METHODS:

Data on cephalosporin consumption were obtained from the VetStat database. For detection of ESC-producing E. coli, three sampling types were included: at slaughter, caecal samples were collected from pigs in 2009 and 2010 (June) before and in two periods (2010 and 2011) after a voluntary ban on cephalosporins was effected (July 2010); at farm level, pools of five stool samples from different pigsties were collected in 2010 and in 2011; and samples from pork were collected randomly at retail stores and outlets from 2009 to 2011. ESC-producing E. coli was isolated after selective enrichment in MacConkey broth with 1 mg/L ceftriaxone. ESC genes were detected using PCR, microtube array and sequencing.

RESULTS:

From July 2010 the consumption of cephalosporins approximated zero. The occurrence of ESC-producing E. coli in pigs at slaughter was not significantly different (P=0.7) between 2009 [10.8% (85/786)] and 2010 [11.8% (48/407)], but in 2011 the occurrence [3.6% (28/777)] decreased significantly (P<0.001). A significant decrease (P=0.002) in occurrence of ESC-producing E. coli at pig farm level from 2010 [11% (11/99)] to 2011 (0/78) was also observed. The bla(CTX-M-1) gene was most often detected (63%), but bla(CTX-M-14) and bla(CTX-M-15) were also found. Occurrence in pork was between 1.3% and 0.9%.

CONCLUSIONS:

The discontinuation of an already low use of cephalosporins in pig production has significantly reduced the occurrence of ESC-producing E. coli.

PMID:
23129728
DOI:
10.1093/jac/dks427
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Silverchair Information Systems
Loading ...
Support Center