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Curr Opin Lipidol. 2013 Feb;24(1):41-8. doi: 10.1097/MOL.0b013e3283592eea.

Dietary fats and other nutrients on stroke.

Author information

1
Division of Nutritional Epidemiology, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. Susanna.Larsson@ki.se

Abstract

PURPOSE OF REVIEW:

This review summarizes current epidemiologic evidence regarding the associations of dietary fat and other nutrients with risk of stroke.

RECENT FINDINGS:

Recent epidemiologic studies show no association of total fat intake or absolute intakes of saturated, monounsaturated, or polyunsaturated fat with risk of stroke. Data on long-chain omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids in relation to stroke risk are inconclusive but may favor fewer strokes in women. Insufficient evidence exists for trans fatty acids, other fatty acids, and dietary cholesterol intake. Present evidence indicates that high dietary magnesium and potassium intakes may lower the risk of stroke, whereas a high sodium (salt) intake and a low dietary vitamin D intake likely increase stroke risk. Calcium does not prevent stroke in populations with moderate-to-high calcium intakes but might play a role in populations with low calcium intakes. Supplementation with single vitamins likely has no protective effect on stroke in well nourished populations.

SUMMARY:

Available epidemiologic evidence indicates that diets high in magnesium and potassium may play a role in the prevention of stroke, whereas a high sodium intake is a risk factor. It remains unclear whether specific fatty acids, dietary cholesterol, and combinations of vitamins affect the risk of stroke.

PMID:
23123763
DOI:
10.1097/MOL.0b013e3283592eea
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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