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Contraception. 2013 Jun;87(6):782-9. doi: 10.1016/j.contraception.2012.09.026. Epub 2012 Oct 31.

The use of dual or two methods for pregnancy and HIV prevention amongst 18-24-year-olds in a cross-sectional study conducted in South Africa.

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  • 1HIV/AIDS, STIs and TB (HAST) Research Programme, Human Sciences Research Council, Private Bag X41, Pretoria 0001, South Africa.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

The use of dual (for pregnancy and disease prevention) or two methods of contraceptives is recommended for the prevention of unwanted pregnancies and protection against sexually transmitted diseases such as HIV. The study aims to assess the prevalence and explore factors associated with the use of dual or two methods among young people aged 18 to 24 years in South Africa.

METHODS:

Factors associated with use of dual or two methods among young people aged 18 to 24 years in South Africa were investigated by individual interviews. The final sample included 1127 males and 1007 females from four provinces (Eastern Cape, Gauteng, KwaZulu-Natal and Mpumalanga) who reported to have ever had sex.

RESULTS:

The study found among men (18-24 years) 10.4% and among women (18-24 years) 15.4%, current use of dual or two methods was reported. In multivariate analyses, among women, lower poverty, not being unemployed, having concurrent sexual partners and higher sexual intercourse frequency in the past month were associated with use of dual or two methods, while for men, contraceptive methods knowledge, greater relationship control and higher sexual intercourse frequency in the past month were associated with use of dual or two methods.

CONCLUSION:

The use of dual or two methods remains low. Innovative ways are needed for the promotion and increased use of dual or two methods.

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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