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Eur J Nutr. 2013 Aug;52(5):1523-32. doi: 10.1007/s00394-012-0459-5. Epub 2012 Nov 2.

An atherogenic diet decreases liver FXR gene expression and causes severe hepatic steatosis and hepatic cholesterol accumulation: effect of endurance training.

Author information

1
Department of Kinesiology, Université de Montréal, C.P. 6128, Succ. centre-ville, Montreal, QC H3C 3J7, Canada.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

The aim of this study was to determine the effects of an atherogenic diet (AD; 40 % lipid, 1.25 % cholesterol, kcal) on triglyceride (TAG) and cholesterol accumulation in liver and on gene expression of liver X receptor (LXR) and farnesoid X receptor (FXR) and their target genes and to observe if these responses are affected by endurance training.

METHODS:

Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 32) were divided into two groups and randomly assigned to an AD or a standard diet (SD) for 7 weeks. Half of the rats in each group were assigned to an exercise training program for 5 days/week.

RESULTS:

The AD resulted in a large (P < 0.01) accumulation in liver TAG (4×) along with elevated liver and plasma cholesterol without any gain in peripheral fat mass. The liver TAG and cholesterol accumulations were associated with an important reduction (P < 0.01; 60 %) in FXR, but no change in LXR transcripts. Accompanying the reduction in FXR gene expression, we found an increase (P < 0.001) in SREBP-1c and a decrease (P < 0.01) in MTP mRNAs suggesting an increased lipogenesis and a reduced VLDL production, respectively. The AD was also associated with lower HMG-CoA-r, squalene synthase, and ABCG8 transcripts (P < 0.001). In the intestine, exercise training resulted in higher NPC1L1, ABCG5, and ABCG8 in SD-fed animals, while all these increases were suppressed under the AD feeding.

CONCLUSIONS:

It is concluded that dietary cholesterol favors liver TAG and cholesterol accumulations associated with an important reduction in FXR transcripts.

PMID:
23117815
DOI:
10.1007/s00394-012-0459-5
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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