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Am J Health Promot. 2012 Nov-Dec;27(2):e59-68. doi: 10.4278/ajhp.111222-QUAN-462.

Kaiser Permanente's Community Health Initiative in Northern California: evaluation findings and lessons learned.

Author information

1
Center for Community Health and Evaluation, Group Health Research Institute, Seattle, Washington 98101, USA. cheadle.a@ghc.org

Abstract

PURPOSE:

To describe the evaluation findings and lessons learned from the Kaiser Permanente Healthy Eating Active Living-Community Health Initiative.

DESIGN:

Mixed methods design: qualitative case studies combined with pre/post population-level food and physical activity measures, using matched comparison schools for youth surveys.

SETTING:

Three low-income communities in Northern California (combined population 129,260).

SUBJECTS:

All residents of the three communities.

INTERVENTION:

Five-year grants of $1.5 million awarded to each community to support the implementation of community- and organizational-level policy and environmental changes. Sectors targeted included schools, health care settings, worksites, and neighborhoods.

MEASURES:

Reach (percentage exposed) and strength (effect size) of the interventions combined with population-level measures of physical activity (e.g., minutes of physical activity) and nutrition (e.g., fruit and vegetable servings).

ANALYSIS:

Pre/post analysis of population level measures, comparing changes in intervention to comparison for youth survey measures.

RESULTS:

The population-level results were inconclusive overall, but showed positive and significant findings for four out of nine comparisons where "high-dose" (i.e., greater than 20% of the population reached and high strength) strategies were implemented, primarily physical activity interventions targeting school-age youth.

CONCLUSION:

The positive and significant changes for the high-dose strategies suggest that if environmental interventions are of sufficient reach and strength they may be able to favorably impact obesity-related behaviors.

PMID:
23113787
DOI:
10.4278/ajhp.111222-QUAN-462
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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