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New Microbiol. 2012 Oct;35(4):439-46. Epub 2012 Oct 1.

Antibiotic susceptibility of vancomyin and nitrofurantoin in Staphylococcus aureus isolated from burnt patients in Sulaimaniyah, Iraqi Kurdistan.

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1
Foundation of Technical Education in Sulaimaniyah, Iraqi Kurdistan Region. m.babakir@yahoo.com

Abstract

Burns remain a significant public health problem in terms of morbidity and mortality throughout the world, especially in low and middle-income countries. Burning raptures the skin barriers that normally prevent invasion by microorganisms and infection is a major complication in burn patients. Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is the most important nosocomial pathogen. This retrospective analysis was conducted in the burn unit of the Department of Microbiology in the Sulamaini Plastic Surgery and Burns Hospital. The analysis is based on data collected from the medical records of 2938 burn patients, hospitalized between May 2008 and December 2011. The clinical samples were taken from various body sources for microbiological tests. Patients with a high percentage of total body surface area burnt (P<0.001) and a longer hospital stay (P<0.001) were more likely to have infection compared to other patients. In addition, among all tested antibiotics, vancomycin and nitrofurantion seem to be the most effective antibiotics for MR- SA. Furthermore there was a significant association between age and antibiotic resistance for all antibiotics except for vancomycin and nitrofurantoin. Resistance to antibiotics increased with advancing age. The wide use of antibiotics in the treatment of bacterial infections has probably led to the emergence and spread of resistant strains. Routine microbiological surveillance and careful in vitro testing prior to antibiotic use and strict adherence to hospital antibiotic policy may help in the prevention and treatment of antibiotic resistant pathogens in burn infections.

PMID:
23109011
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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