Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Gait Posture. 2013 Mar;37(3):452-6. doi: 10.1016/j.gaitpost.2012.09.008. Epub 2012 Oct 26.

Foot Type Biomechanics Part 2: are structure and anthropometrics related to function?

Author information

1
Medical Engineering Research Group, Faculty of Science and Technology, Anglia Ruskin University, Bishop Hall Lane, Chelmsford, Essex CM1 1SQ, United Kingdom.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Many foot pathologies are associated with specific foot types. If foot structure and function are related, measurement of either could assist with differential diagnosis of pedal pathologies.

HYPOTHESIS:

Biomechanical measures of foot structure and function are related in asymptomatic healthy individuals.

METHODS:

Sixty-one healthy subjects' left feet were stratified into cavus (n=12), rectus (n=27) and planus (n=22) foot types. Foot structure was assessed by malleolar valgus index, arch height index, and arch height flexibility. Anthropometrics (height and weight), age, and walking speed were measured. Foot function was assessed by center of pressure excursion index, peak plantar pressure, maximum force, and gait pattern parameters. Foot structure and anthropometric variables were entered into stepwise linear regression models to identify predictors of function.

RESULTS:

Measures of foot structure and anthropometrics explained 10-37% of the model variance (adjusted R(2)) for gait pattern parameters. When walking speed was included, the adjusted R(2) increased to 45-77% but foot structure was no longer a factor. Foot structure and anthropometrics predicted 7-47% of the model variance for plantar pressure and 16-64% for maximum force parameters. All multivariate models were significant (p<0.05), supporting acceptance of the hypothesis.

DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSION:

Foot structure and function are related in asymptomatic healthy individuals. The structural parameters employed are basic measurements that do not require ionizing radiation and could be used in a clinical setting. Further research is needed to identify additional predictive parameters (plantar soft tissue characteristics, skeletal alignment, and neuromuscular control) and to include individuals with pathology.

PMID:
23107624
PMCID:
PMC3878980
DOI:
10.1016/j.gaitpost.2012.09.008
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Elsevier Science Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Support Center