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J Am Acad Dermatol. 2013 Apr;68(4):585-91. doi: 10.1016/j.jaad.2012.09.030. Epub 2012 Oct 26.

Fitzpatrick skin phototype is an independent predictor of squamous cell carcinoma risk after solid organ transplantation.

Author information

1
Department of Dermatology, University of California at San Francisco, San Francisco, California 94115, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Solid organ transplant recipients (OTR) are at an increased risk of developing squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the skin after transplantation. In predominantly white cohorts, Fitzpatrick skin type (FST) has been reported to be a risk factor for developing posttransplantation skin cancers.

OBJECTIVE:

Our goal was to determine if FST is a statistically significant risk factor for the development of SCC after solid organ transplantation in a diverse US population of OTR.

METHODS:

A cohort of OTR completed a questionnaire of demographic factors, transplant type, FST, and skin cancer history. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to determine the risk factors for development of SCC after transplantation.

RESULTS:

As expected, male subjects had an increased risk for SCC compared with female subjects (P = .02), and those aged 50 years and older at the time of transplantation were more likely to develop SCC compared with those younger than 50 years (P < .001). The risk of SCC increased with each incremental decrease in FST, from FST VI to FST I (linear test for trend P < .001).

LIMITATIONS:

Our questionnaire did not ask specifically about immunosuppressive medications; instead, organ transplant category was used as a proxy for level of immunosuppression.

CONCLUSIONS:

FST, a patient-reported variable, is an independent risk factor for the development of SCC in OTR, and should be elicited from patients who have gone or will undergo organ transplantation.

PMID:
23107311
PMCID:
PMC3562416
DOI:
10.1016/j.jaad.2012.09.030
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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