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Urology. 2013 Jan;81(1):210.e1-4. doi: 10.1016/j.urology.2012.07.072. Epub 2012 Oct 24.

Polymorphism in the SCN9A voltage-gated sodium channel gene associated with interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome.

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1
Department of Urology, State University of New York Upstate Medical University, Syracuse, New York 13210, USA. reederj@upstate.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To determine whether an association exists between interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome (IC/BPS) and a nonsynonymous single nucleotide polymorphism in the SCN9A voltage-gated sodium channel gene previously associated with other chronic pain syndromes.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

Germline deoxyribonucleic acid was sampled from archived bladder biopsy specimens from patients with a documented diagnosis of IC/BPS. Deoxyribonucleic acid from hysterectomy specimens was obtained as a control population. The genotype of single nucleotide polymorphism rs6746030 was determined by deoxyribonucleic acid sequencing after polymerase chain reaction amplification. Contingency analysis of genotypes was performed using Pearson's chi-square test and Fisher's exact test.

RESULTS:

Polymerase chain reaction product was obtained from 26 of 31 control specimens and from 53 of 57 IC/BPS biopsy specimens. Of the 26 control subjects, 3 (11.5%) were genotype AG and 23 were GG. In contrast, AA or AG genotypes were present in 21 of 53 (39.6%) patients with IC/BPS, a statistically significant difference compared with the controls (Pearson's chi-square, P=.036). Similarly, the A allele was at a greater frequency in the IC/BPS group using Fisher's exact test (P=.009).

CONCLUSION:

These data strongly suggest that pain perception in at least a subset of patients with IC/BPS is influenced by this polymorphism in the SCN9A voltage-gated sodium channel.

Comment in

PMID:
23102778
DOI:
10.1016/j.urology.2012.07.072
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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