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J Pediatr Nurs. 2012 Dec;27(6):607-13. doi: 10.1016/j.pedn.2011.07.007. Epub 2011 Sep 1.

Neurocognitive functioning in children with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome: a pilot study of positive airway pressure therapy.

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  • 1Department of Pediatrics, Division of Pediatric Pulmonology, Children's Hospital Los Angeles, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, USA.

Abstract

Studies of individuals with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) have shown impairment in neurocognitive function. This study investigated the neurocognitive function in children with OSAS before and after positive airway pressure (PAP) therapy. Twenty-one participants with suspected/documented OSAS were recruited, completing the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS), the Child Sleep Habit Questionnaire (CSHQ), and/or the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index. Participants were administered sections of the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-IV, the Delis Kaplan Executive Functioning Scales, the Test of Everyday Attention for Children, and the Wide Range Assessment of Memory and Learning--2nd Edition to assess neurocognitive function. The ESS and the CSHQ indicate that many participants had excessive daytime sleepiness and increased sleep-disordered breathing. Participants before therapy reflected neurocognitive deficiencies in all areas. Of the original 21 children, 4 completed the full PAP treatment and were reevaluated, demonstrating improvements in memory and motor speed. Children with OSAS reported sleep-disordered breathing, increased daytime sleepiness, and deficiencies in neurocognitive measures. Correcting these sleep impairments appeared to reduce global neurocognitive deficits while improving memory and processing speed.

PMID:
23101726
DOI:
10.1016/j.pedn.2011.07.007
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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