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Osteoporos Int. 2013 Jan;24(1):253-62. doi: 10.1007/s00198-012-2179-3. Epub 2012 Oct 26.

A meta-analysis characterizing the dose-response relationships for three oral nitrogen-containing bisphosphonates in postmenopausal women.

Author information

1
yatesjy@gmail.com

Abstract

A meta-analysis of spine BMD dose-response relationships for alendronate, risedronate, and ibandronate was performed. Data from all three oral bisphosphonates conform to a log-linear relationship between dose and change in spine BMD relative to placebo at 1 year, with an incremental gain of about 1 % for each doubling of dose.

INTRODUCTION:

Animal data suggesting differences in potency and differences in approved oral dosage strengths for alendronate, risedronate, and ibandronate in the treatment of osteoporosis raise questions about their dose-response relationships and relative potencies in humans.

METHODS:

A meta-analysis of dose-response relationships for spine BMD increases for these three bisphosphonates was performed using data from 21 placebo-controlled trials that collectively included over 13,000 patients on active treatment and over 8,000 on placebo.

RESULTS:

For alendronate over the range of 1 to 20 mg/day, there was a strong log-linear relationship between dose and the increase in spine BMD relative to placebo at 1 year (R (2) = 0.994 using sample-weighted means). For each doubling in alendronate dose, there was an incremental gain of about 1 % in spine BMD. On the same scale, risedronate and ibandronate are approximately equipotent to alendronate on a weight-for-weight basis. The increases in BMD efficacy with each doubling of dose are parallel for all three nitrogen-containing bisphosphonates (NCBPs).

CONCLUSIONS:

All three NCBPs are approximately equipotent and exhibit a log-linear relationship between dose and the increase in spine BMD. Differences in efficacy between the available oral bisphosphonate regimens appear to be a function of dose rather than inherent differences in therapeutic potential.

PMID:
23100120
DOI:
10.1007/s00198-012-2179-3
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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