Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Health Place. 2012 Nov;18(6):1314-22. doi: 10.1016/j.healthplace.2012.09.002. Epub 2012 Sep 18.

The built environment and risk of obesity in the United States: racial-ethnic disparities.

Author information

1
Department of Sociology, University of Utah, 380 S 1530 E Rm 301, Salt Lake City, UT 84112, United States. ming.wen@soc.utah.edu

Abstract

Using data from the 2003-2008 waves of the continuous National Health Nutrition Examination Survey merged with the 2000 census and GIS-based data, this study conducted genderspecific analyses to explore whether neighborhood built environment attributes are significant correlates of obesity risk and mediators of obesity disparities by race-ethnicity. Results indicate that the built environment is a significant correlate of obesity risk but is not much of a mediator of obesity disparities by race-ethnicity. Neighborhood walkability, density, and distance to parks are significant covariates of obesity risks net of individual and neighborhood controls. Gender differences are found for some of these associations.

PMID:
23099113
PMCID:
PMC3501580
DOI:
10.1016/j.healthplace.2012.09.002
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Elsevier Science Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Support Center