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J Pediatr Adolesc Gynecol. 2012 Dec;25(6):390-5. doi: 10.1016/j.jpag.2012.07.006. Epub 2012 Oct 22.

Clinical and metabolic features of polycystic ovary syndrome among Chinese adolescents.

Author information

1
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Sun Yat-Sen Memorial Hospital of Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou, China.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To explore the clinical and metabolic features exhibited by Chinese adolescents with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) and to determine the differences between nonobese and obese adolescent patients with PCOS.

DESIGN:

Clinical cross-sectional study.

SETTING:

Department of Gynecology and Reproductive Center.

PARTICIPANTS:

25 obese and 66 nonobese adolescents with PCOS and 26 age-matched controls.

INTERVENTIONS:

Fasting venous blood samples and an oral glucose tolerance test using 75 g of glucose were obtained from PCOS patients and controls.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Clinical features were summarized. Serum levels of FSH, LH, E(2), TT, SHBG, fasting insulin, and fasting glucose were measured.

RESULTS:

The prevalence of obesity in adolescents with PCOS was 27% (25/91). 99% of these patients presented with menstrual disorders, 84% presented with clinical and/or biochemical hyperandrogenism, and 90% exhibited an ultrasonographic appearance of polycystic ovaries. The prevalence of hirsutism and acanthosis nigricans were higher in the obese PCOS group than in the nonobese PCOS group (72% vs 41% and 44% vs 5%, respectively). A total of 5 of 20 obese (25%) and 5 of 36 nonobese patients (14%) demonstrated impaired glucose tolerance levels.

CONCLUSIONS:

Chinese adolescents with PCOS manifest clinical and metabolic features similar to those of adult Chinese women with PCOS except for the increased prevalence of hyperandrogenism and insulin resistance. Adolescents with high risk factors, especially those with menstrual disorders and hyperandrogenism, may need careful clinical screening.

PMID:
23089573
DOI:
10.1016/j.jpag.2012.07.006
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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