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J Infect Dis. 2013 Jan 1;207(1):98-105. doi: 10.1093/infdis/jis652. Epub 2012 Oct 18.

1976 and 2009 H1N1 influenza virus vaccines boost anti-hemagglutinin stalk antibodies in humans.

Author information

1
Department of Microbiology, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, New York 10029, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Infection with pandemic H1N1 influenza A viruses (IAVs) containing hemagglutinin (HA) proteins with globular heads that differ substantially from seasonal strains results in a boost in broadly cross-reactive antibodies that bind to the HA stalk. Boosting these antibodies has become an attractive strategy for creating a universal IAV vaccine. Therefore, it was essential to determine whether vaccines containing H1N1 viruses whose head domains differ substantially compared to seasonal strains could also achieve this boost.

METHODS:

Prospective samples of subjects who had received the A/New Jersey/1976 (NJ/76) vaccine and healthy, age-matched controls were assessed for the presence of anti-HA stalk antibodies before and after receiving the A/California/04/2009 (Cal/09) vaccine between October 2009 and January 2010.

RESULTS:

Individuals who received either the NJ/76 vaccine or the Cal/09 vaccine experienced a robust boost in HA stalk-reactive, neutralizing antibodies similar to what has been observed in individuals infected with Cal/09.

CONCLUSIONS:

These results demonstrate that vaccines containing viruses whose HA head domains that differ substantially from seasonal strains are capable of boosting titers of HA stalk antibodies. Furthermore, anti-HA stalk antibodies elicited by vaccination appear to be long-lived and therefore could be targeted for the generation of a universal IAV vaccine.

PMID:
23087428
PMCID:
PMC3523798
DOI:
10.1093/infdis/jis652
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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