Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Eat Weight Disord. 2012 Sep;17(3):e185-93.

Lifetime and recent DSM and ICD psychiatric comorbidity of inpatients engaging in different eating disorder behaviours.

Author information

1
Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University of Sydney, Royal North Shore Hospital, St. Leonards, NSW, Australia. asvonlo@med.usyd.edu.au

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Previous studies investigating psychiatric comorbidity in eating disorder (ED) patients compared groups according to ED diagnoses. The current paper compared groups according to ED behaviours: self-induced vomiting, objective binge eating, excessive exercising, and to body mass index (BMI, kg/m(2)) for selected psychiatric comorbidity using two systems: Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders - Fourth Edition (DSM-IV) and International Classification of Diseases - Tenth Revision (ICD-10) diagnoses.

METHOD:

Two hundred and twenty-six patients admitted for treatment in a specialised Eating Disorders Unit completed the Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI). Lifetime and recent (12 months) psychiatric diagnoses were produced according to DSM-IV and ICD-10. Associations between presence of ED behaviours or BMI and psychiatric comorbidity were investigated.

RESULTS:

Eighty-eight percent of patients had a lifetime history (72% recent history) of at least one comorbid diagnosis (regardless of diagnostic system). Agreement between the systems was high for mood (affective) disorders and moderate for anxiety/somatoform disorders. Significantly more patients who vomit had lifetime and recent mood (affective) disorders (DSM-IV and ICD-10). Significantly more 'vomiters' had recent anxiety disorders (DSM-IV) and neurotic, stress-related and somatoform disorders (ICD-10) including post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD; DSM-IV and ICD-10). More patients with BMI >17.5 kg/m(2) had lifetime and recent mood (affective) disorders and lifetime PTSD (DSM-IV and ICD-10). The results for 'excessive exercisers' varied and appeared inconsistent. There were no differences in any disorders for objective binge eaters.

DISCUSSION:

Patients who induce vomiting have more psychiatric comorbidity than 'non-vomiters', both lifetime and recent, and may benefit from diagnostic recognition as a separate group, for example 'vomiting' or 'purging' ED, who can then receive specialist treatment for their comorbidity and associated problems.

PMID:
23086254
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Loading ...
    Support Center