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Eur Spine J. 2013 Jan;22(1):72-8. doi: 10.1007/s00586-012-2544-0. Epub 2012 Oct 21.

One-stage surgical management for tuberculosis of the upper cervical spine by posterior debridement, short-segment fusion, and posterior instrumentation in children.

Author information

1
Department of Spine Surgery, Xiangya Hospital of Central South University, Xiangya Road 87, ChangSha 410008, China. zhq9996@163.com

Abstract

PURPOSE:

To evaluate the clinical study efficacy and feasibility of 11 children with tuberculosis of the upper cervical spine treated by one-stage posterior debridement, short-segment fusion, and posterior instrumentation.

METHODS:

Eleven children who suffered from tuberculosis of the upper cervical spine were admitted to our hospital between June 2005 and December 2010. All of them were treated by one-stage posterior debridement, short-segment fusion, and posterior instrumentation. Then, the clinical efficacy was evaluated using statistical analysis based on the materials about the visual analogue scale (VAS) scores of pain, JOA scores of nerve function and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), which were collected at certain time.

RESULTS:

The average follow-up period was 28.1 ± 10.5 months (13-42 months). In the 11 cases, no postoperative complications related to instrumentation occurred and neurologic function was improved in various degrees. The average pretreatment ESR was 58.4 ± 4.9 mm/h (53-69 mm/h), which got normal (8.9 ± 6.5 mm/h) within 3 months in all patients. The average preoperative VAS was 7.4 ± 2.2, which decreased to 1.6 ± 1.8 postoperatively. Mean preoperative JOA was 11.2 ± 3.8, and the JOA at the last visit was 16.3 ± 1.0. All patients got bony fusion within 3-8 months after surgery.

CONCLUSIONS:

One-stage posterior debridement, short-segment fusion, and posterior instrumentation can be an effective treatment method for the treatment of tuberculosis of the upper cervical spine in children.

PMID:
23085858
PMCID:
PMC3540302
DOI:
10.1007/s00586-012-2544-0
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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