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Am J Phys Med Rehabil. 2012 Nov;91(11):922-30. doi: 10.1097/PHM.0b013e318269d89f.

Exercise adherence during home-based functional electrical stimulation cycling by individuals with spinal cord injury.

Author information

1
Spinal Cord Injury and Disorders Center, McGuire VAMC, Richmond, VA, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The typically sedentary spinal cord injured population has limited physical activity options because of muscle paralysis, difficulties in transportation, and barriers to access rehabilitation/wellness facilities. It is important to investigate physical activity alternatives to increase physical activity levels and decrease the risk of inactivity-derived diseases. The goal of this study was to determine the effects of a home-based functional electrical stimulation cycling program on exercise adherence of those with spinal cord injury.

DESIGN:

Seventeen Veterans with posttraumatic C4-T11 American Spinal Injury Association Impairment Scale A-C spinal cord injury participated in two 8-wk exercise periods of home-based functional electrical stimulation lower extremity cycling. Exercise adherence and the effects of six factors thought to influence exercise adherence were studied during both exercise periods.

RESULTS:

Exercise adherence rates for exercise periods 1 and 2 were 71.7% and 62.9%, respectively. Age, history of exercise, and pain not associated with the exercise activity were determined to have significant impact on exercise adherence rates.

CONCLUSIONS:

Exercise adherence rates were well above the reported 35% in the able-bodied population, which provides evidence for the feasibility of a home-based functional electrical stimulation lower extremity cycling program. Younger adults with a history of being physically active have the highest potential for exercise adherence.

PMID:
23085704
DOI:
10.1097/PHM.0b013e318269d89f
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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