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Semin Cell Dev Biol. 2012 Dec;23(9):946-53. doi: 10.1016/j.semcdb.2012.10.001. Epub 2012 Oct 17.

Epithelial stem cells and implications for wound repair.

Author information

1
Department of Dermatology, Kligman Laboratories, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA.

Abstract

Activation of epithelial stem cells and efficient recruitment of their proliferating progeny plays a critical role in cutaneous wound healing. The reepithelialized wound epidermis has a mosaic composition consisting of progeny that can be traced back both to epidermal and several types of hair follicle stem cells. The contribution of hair follicle stem cells to wound epidermis is particularly intriguing as it involves lineage identity change from follicular to epidermal. Studies from our laboratory show that hair follicle-fated bulge stem cells commit only transient amplifying epidermal progeny that participate in the initial wound re-epithelialization, but eventually are outcompeted by other epidermal clones and largely disappear after a few months. Conversely, recently described stem cell populations residing in the isthmus portion of hair follicle contribute long-lasting progeny toward wound epidermis and, arguably, give rise to new interfollicular epidermal stem cells. The role of epithelial stem cells during wound healing is not limited to regenerating stratified epidermis. By studying regenerative response in large cutaneous wounds, our laboratory uncovered that epithelial cells in the center of the wound can acquire greater morphogenetic plasticity and, together with the underlying wound dermis, can engage in an embryonic-like process of hair follicle neogenesis. Future studies should uncover the cellular and signaling basis of this remarkable adult wound regeneration phenomenon.

PMID:
23085626
PMCID:
PMC3518754
DOI:
10.1016/j.semcdb.2012.10.001
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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