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J Pediatr. 2013 Mar;162(3):543-51. doi: 10.1016/j.jpeds.2012.08.036. Epub 2012 Oct 17.

Exercise improves behavioral, neurocognitive, and scholastic performance in children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder.

Author information

1
Department of Kinesiology and Community Health, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, IL, USA. pontifex@msu.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To examine the effect of a single bout of moderate-intensity aerobic exercise on preadolescent children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) using objective measures of attention, brain neurophysiology, and academic performance.

STUDY DESIGN:

Using a within-participants design, task performance and event-related brain potentials were assessed while participants performed an attentional-control task following a bout of exercise or seated reading during 2 separate, counterbalanced sessions.

RESULTS:

Following a single 20-minute bout of exercise, both children with ADHD and healthy match control children exhibited greater response accuracy and stimulus-related processing, with the children with ADHD also exhibiting selective enhancements in regulatory processes, compared with after a similar duration of seated reading. In addition, greater performance in the areas of reading and arithmetic were observed following exercise in both groups.

CONCLUSION:

These findings indicate that single bouts of moderately intense aerobic exercise may have positive implications for aspects of neurocognitive function and inhibitory control in children with ADHD.

PMID:
23084704
PMCID:
PMC3556380
DOI:
10.1016/j.jpeds.2012.08.036
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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