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Arthroscopy. 2012 Dec;28(12):1805-11. doi: 10.1016/j.arthro.2012.06.011. Epub 2012 Oct 17.

Arthroscopic reconstruction of isolated subscapularis tears: clinical results and structural integrity after 24 months.

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1
Center for Orthopedics and Traumatology, St. Anna Hospital Herne, Herne, Germany. r.heikenfeld@annahospital.de

Abstract

PURPOSE:

The purpose of this study was to evaluate the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and clinical results of arthroscopic repair of isolated subscapularis tears at 24 months' follow-up.

METHODS:

We prospectively followed up 20 patients with isolated subscapularis tears treated with arthroscopic repair with suture anchors in a 3-year period (January 2006 to December 2008) at our institution. Clinical examination of the patients and functional scores (Constant and University of California, Los Angeles [UCLA] scores) were obtained preoperatively and at 6 months, 12 months, and 24 months postoperatively. MRI and routine radiographs were obtained to evaluate the repair at the last follow-up.

RESULTS:

Of the patients (mean age, 42 years; age range, 31 to 56 years), 19 (95%) had complete follow-up. Constant and UCLA scores improved significantly after the repair at all postoperative examinations. The Constant score gained 39.7 points to a mean of 81 points (range, 61 to 95 points) at last follow-up, and the UCLA score improved from 16 points to 32 points (range, 25 to 35 points). Of the shoulders, 13 had a concomitant lesion of the long head of the biceps; 12 were treated with biceps tenodesis. At last follow-up, there were 2 retears detected by both MRI and examinations (positive belly-press and liftoff tests). Seventeen patients were satisfied with their results at 24 months postoperatively.

CONCLUSIONS:

Arthroscopic repair of isolated subscapularis tendon tears is an effective technique with good-to-excellent clinical and functional results.

LEVEL OF EVIDENCE:

Level IV, therapeutic case series.

PMID:
23084151
DOI:
10.1016/j.arthro.2012.06.011
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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