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PLoS One. 2012;7(10):e47380. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0047380. Epub 2012 Oct 17.

Association between childhood obesity and metabolic syndrome: evidence from a large sample of Chinese children and adolescents.

Author information

1
Department of Epidemiology, Capital Institute of Pediatrics, Beijing, China.

Abstract

Data about metabolic syndrome (MetS) in children is limited in China. We aimed to assess the prevalence of MetS related components, and their association with obesity. Data were collected as part of a representative study on MetS among 19593 children, aged 6-18 years old in Beijing. General obesity was assessed by body mass index (BMI) and central obesity by waist circumference. Finger capillary blood tests were used to assess triglyceride (TG), total cholesterol (TC) and impaired fasting glucose (IFG). Vein blood samples were collected from a subsample of 3814 children aged 10-18 years to classify MetS. MetS was defined according to the International Diabetes Federation 2007 definition. The associations between MetS related components and the degree and type of obesity were tested using logistic regression models. The prevalence of overweight, obesity, high blood pressure, elevated TG, TC and IFG were 13.6%, 5.8%, 8.5%, 8.8%, 1.2% and 2.5%, respectively. Compared with normal weight children, overweight and obese children were more likely to have other MetS related components. In the subsample of 3814 children aged 10-18 years, the prevalence of MetS was much higher in obese subjects than in their normal weight counterparts (27.6% vs. 0.2%). Children with both general and central obesity had the highest prevalence of MetS. Compared with normal weight children, overweight and obese children were more likely to have MetS (overweight: OR=67.33, 95%CI=21.32-212.61; obesity: OR=249.99, 95% CI=79.51-785.98). Prevalence of MetS related components has reached high level among Beijing children who were overweight or obese. The association between metabolic disorders and obesity was strong.

PMID:
23082159
PMCID:
PMC3474816
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0047380
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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