Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Adv Exp Med Biol. 2012;758:1-5. doi: 10.1007/978-94-007-4584-1_1.

The role of hypoxia-inducible factors in oxygen sensing by the carotid body.

Author information

1
Department of Pediatrics, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA. gsemenza@jhmi.edu

Abstract

Chronic intermittent hypoxia (IH) associated with sleep-disordered breathing is an important cause of hypertension, which results from carotid body-mediated activation of the sympathetic nervous system. IH triggers increased levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the carotid body, which induce increased synthesis and stability of hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) and calpain-dependent degradation of HIF-2α. HIF-1 activates transcription of the Nox2 gene, encoding NADPH oxidase 2, which generates superoxide. Loss of HIF-2 activity leads to decreased transcription of the Sod2 gene, encoding manganese superoxide dismutase, which converts superoxide to hydrogen peroxide. Thus, IH disrupts the balance between HIF-1-dependent pro-oxidant and HIF-2-dependent anti-oxidant activities, and this loss of redox homeostasis underlies the pathogenesis of autonomic morbidities associated with IH.

PMID:
23080136
PMCID:
PMC3715076
DOI:
10.1007/978-94-007-4584-1_1
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Springer Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center