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Am J Public Health. 2012 Dec;102(12):e111-7. doi: 10.2105/AJPH.2012.300780. Epub 2012 Oct 18.

Perceived discrimination and DSM-IV-based alcohol and illicit drug use disorders.

Author information

1
Department of Health and Kinesiology, College of Health and Human Services, and the Center for Poverty and Health Inequity, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907, USA. hhunte@purdue.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

We examined the relationship between everyday and major discrimination and alcohol and drug use disorders in a nationally representative sample of African Americans and Black Caribbeans.

METHODS:

With data from the National Survey of American Life Study, we employed multivariable logistic regression analyses--while controlling for potential confounders--to examine the relationship between everyday and major discrimination and substance use disorders on the basis of Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders criteria.

RESULTS:

Every 1 unit increase in the everyday discrimination scale positively predicted alcohol (odds ratio [OR] = 1.02; P < .01) and drug use (OR = 1.02; P < .05) disorders. Similarly, each additional major discrimination event positively predicted alcohol (OR = 1.10; P < .05) and drug use (OR = 1.15; P < .01) disorders.

CONCLUSIONS:

To our knowledge, this study is the first to examine problematic usage patterns rather than infrequent use of alcohol and drugs in a national sample of African American and Black Caribbean adults and the first to examine this particular relationship in a national sample of Black Caribbeans.

PMID:
23078466
PMCID:
PMC3519310
DOI:
10.2105/AJPH.2012.300780
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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