Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
PLoS One. 2012;7(10):e47427. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0047427. Epub 2012 Oct 15.

Imbalanced oxidative stress causes chlamydial persistence during non-productive human herpes virus co-infection.

Author information

1
Biocenter, Chair of Microbiology, University of Würzburg, Würzburg, Germany.

Abstract

Both human herpes viruses and Chlamydia are highly prevalent in the human population and are detected together in different human disorders. Here, we demonstrate that co-infection with human herpes virus 6 (HHV6) interferes with the developmental cycle of C. trachomatis and induces persistence. Induction of chlamydial persistence by HHV6 is independent of productive virus infection, but requires the interaction and uptake of the virus by the host cell. On the other hand, viral uptake is strongly promoted under co-infection conditions. Host cell glutathione reductase activity was suppressed by HHV6 causing NADPH accumulation, decreased formation of reduced glutathione and increased oxidative stress. Prevention of oxidative stress restored infectivity of Chlamydia after HHV6-induced persistence. We show that co-infection with Herpes simplex virus 1 or human Cytomegalovirus also induces chlamydial persistence by a similar mechanism suggesting that Chlamydia -human herpes virus co-infections are evolutionary shaped interactions with a thus far unrecognized broad significance.

PMID:
23077614
PMCID:
PMC3471814
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0047427
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Public Library of Science Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Support Center