Format

Send to

Choose Destination
PLoS One. 2012;7(10):e45396. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0045396. Epub 2012 Oct 15.

Reproducibility and respiratory function correlates of exhaled breath fingerprint in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

Author information

1
Chair of Geriatrics, Unit of Respiratory Pathophysiology, Campus Bio-Medico University, Rome, Italy.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The electronic nose (e nose) provides distinctive breath fingerprints for selected respiratory diseases. Both reproducibility and respiratory function correlates of breath fingerprint are poorly known.

OBJECTIVES:

To measure reproducibility of breath fingerprints and to assess their correlates among respiratory function indexes in elderly healthy and COPD subjects.

METHOD:

25 subjects (5 COPD patients for each GOLD stage and 5 healthy controls) over 65 years underwent e-nose study through a seven sensor system and respiratory function tests at times 0, 7, and 15 days. Reproducibility of the e nose pattern was computed. The correlation between volatile organic compound (VOC) pattern and respiratory function/clinical parameters was assessed by the Spearman's rho.

MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS:

VOC patterns were highly reproducible within healthy and GOLD 4 COPD subjects, less among GOLD 1-3 patients.VOC patterns significantly correlated with expiratory flows (Spearman's rho ranging from 0.36 for MEF25% and sensor Co-Buti-TPP, to 0.81 for FEV1% and sensor Cu-Buti-TPP p<0.001)), but not with residual volume and total lung capacity.

CONCLUSIONS:

VOC patterns strictly correlated with expiratory flows. Thus, e nose might conveniently be used to assess COPD severity and, likely, to study phenotypic variability. However, the suboptimal reproducibility within GOLD 1-3 patients should stimulate further research to identify more reproducible breath print patterns.

PMID:
23077492
PMCID:
PMC3471938
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0045396
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Public Library of Science Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center