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BMC Gastroenterol. 2012 Oct 18;12:145. doi: 10.1186/1471-230X-12-145.

Effects of coffee, smoking, and alcohol on liver function tests: a comprehensive cross-sectional study.

Author information

1
Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine, 166 Gumi-ro, Bundang-gu, Seongnam-si, 463-707, Gyeonggi-do, Republic of Korea.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Liver function tests (LFTs) can be affected by many factors and the proposed effects of coffee on LFT require a comprehensive evaluation. The aim of this study was to elucidate whether drinking coffee, smoking, or drinking alcohol have independent effects on LFTs in Korean health-check examinees.

METHODS:

We used the responses of 500 health-check examinees, who had participated in a self-administered questionnaire survey about coffee, alcohol drinking, and smoking habits.

RESULTS:

Coffee consumption was closely related to male gender, high body mass index (BMI), alcohol drinking, and smoking. On univariable and multivariable analyses, drinking coffee lowered serum levels of total protein, albumin, and aspartate aminotransferases (AST). On multivariable analyses, smoking raised serum γ-glutamyl transferase (GGT) level and decreased serum protein and albumin levels, while alcohol drinking raised GGT level after adjustment for age, gender, regular medication, BMI, coffee and alcohol drinking amounts, and smoking.

CONCLUSIONS:

Coffee consumption, smoking, and alcohol drinking affect the individual components of LFT in different ways, and the above 3 habits each have an impact on LFTs. Therefore, their effects on LFTs should be carefully interpreted, and further study on the mechanism of the effects is warranted.

PMID:
23075166
PMCID:
PMC3531257
DOI:
10.1186/1471-230X-12-145
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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