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Psychopharmacology (Berl). 2013 Mar;226(2):241-6. doi: 10.1007/s00213-012-2891-x. Epub 2012 Oct 16.

Discriminative stimulus effects of N,N-diisopropyltryptamine.

Author information

1
Department of Pharmacology and Neuroscience, University of North Texas Health Science Center, 3500 Camp Bowie Blvd, Fort Worth, TX 76107-2699, USA.

Abstract

RATIONALE:

Serotonergic hallucinogens such as (+)-lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) and dimethyltryptamine (DMT) produce distinctive visual effects, whereas the synthetic hallucinogen N,N-diisopropyltryptamine (DiPT) is known for its production of auditory distortions.

OBJECTIVE:

This study compares the discriminative stimulus effects of DiPT to those of visual hallucinogens.

METHODS:

Adult male rats were trained to discriminate DiPT (5 mg/kg, 15 min) from saline under a FR10 schedule. A dose-effect and time course of DiPT's discriminative stimulus effects were established. DMT, (-)-2,5-dimethoxy-4-methylamphetamine (DOM), LSD, (±)-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA), and (+)-methamphetamine were tested for cross-substitution in DiPT-trained animals.

RESULTS:

Rats learned to discriminate DiPT from saline in an average of 60 training sessions (30 drug and 30 saline). DiPT (0.5-5 mg/kg) produced dose-dependent increases in drug-appropriate responding (DAR) to 99 % (ED(50) = 2.47 mg/kg). Onset of the discriminative stimulus effects was within 5 min, and the effects dissipated within 4 h. Full substitution for the discriminative stimulus effects of DiPT occurred with LSD, DOM, and MDMA. DMT only partially substituted for DiPT (65 % DAR), whereas (+)-methamphetamine failed to substitute for DiPT (29 % DAR).

CONCLUSIONS:

The discriminative stimulus effects of DiPT were similar those of a number of synthetic hallucinogens, only partially similar to those of DMT, but not similar to (+)-methamphetamine. The putative DiPT-induced auditory distortions do not lead to discriminative stimulus effects distinguishable from other hallucinogens.

PMID:
23070023
PMCID:
PMC3577941
DOI:
10.1007/s00213-012-2891-x
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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