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Gastrointest Endosc. 2013 Jan;77(1):47-54. doi: 10.1016/j.gie.2012.08.034. Epub 2012 Oct 11.

Endoscopic treatment of anastomotic biliary strictures after living donor liver transplantation: outcomes after maximal stent therapy.

Author information

1
Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Mayo Clinic Arizona, Scottsdale, AZ 85259, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Living-donor liver transplantation (LDLT) has emerged as a viable strategy in an era of organ shortage. However, biliary strictures are a common complication of LDLT, and these strictures frequently require surgical revision after unsuccessful endoscopic therapy. The optimal endoscopic treatment for anastomotic biliary strictures (ABSs) after LDLT is undefined.

OBJECTIVE:

To determine the outcome of an aggressive endoscopic approach to ABSs after LDLT that uses endoscopic dilation followed by maximal stent placement.

DESIGN:

A retrospective study.

SETTING:

A tertiary-care academic medical center.

PATIENTS:

Forty-one patients with a diagnosis of ABS.

INTERVENTIONS:

Endoscopic retrograde cholangiography with balloon dilation and maximal stenting.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASUREMENTS:

Stricture resolution, stricture recurrence, and complication rates.

RESULTS:

Of 110 LDLTs completed, a biliary stricture developed after transplantation in 41 (37.3%), which included 38 patients with duct-to-duct anastomosis. The median (interquartile range [IQR]) follow-up time is 74.2 (2.5-120.8) months. Among them, 23 (60.5%) were male, and 20 (52.6%) had bile leakage associated with ABSs. The median time (IQR) to the development of an ABS after LDLT was 2.1 (1.2-4.1) months. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiography was attempted as initial therapy in all patients: 32 were managed entirely by endoscopic therapy, and 6 required initial percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography (PTC) to cross the biliary stricture, with endoscopic therapy performed thereafter. A median (IQR) of 4.0 (3.0-5.3) endoscopic interventions and 7.0 (4.0-10.3) stents were required to resolve the stricture. The time from the first intervention to stricture resolution was 5.3 (range 3.8-8.9) months. Biochemical markers including aspartate transaminase (76 vs 39 U/L, P = .001), alanine transaminase (127.5 vs 45.5 U/L, P < .001), alkaline phosphatase (590 vs 260 IU/L, P < .001), and total bilirubin (2.57 vs 1.73 mg/dL, P = .017) significantly improved after intervention. Recurrent stricture was observed after initial treatment in 8 (21%) patients. All recurrences were successfully re-treated endoscopically. All patients have been managed without surgical revision or retransplantation, resulting in 100% success by an intention-to-treat analysis.

LIMITATIONS:

Retrospective study, small sample size.

CONCLUSIONS:

In this series, aggressive endoscopy-based treatment with maximal stent placement strategy allows 100% resolution of all duct-to-duct ABSs after LDLT without the need for surgical intervention or retransplantation.

PMID:
23062758
DOI:
10.1016/j.gie.2012.08.034
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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