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Nature. 2012 Oct 18;490(7420):384-7. doi: 10.1038/nature11563. Epub 2012 Oct 10.

Bonding and structure of a reconstructed (001) surface of SrTiO3 from TEM.

Author information

1
Canadian Centre for Electron Microscopy and Department of Materials Science and Engineering, McMaster University, 1280 Main Street West, Ontario L8S 4M1, Canada.

Abstract

The determination of the atomic structure and the retrieval of information about reconstruction and bonding of metal oxide surfaces is challenging owing to the highly defective structure and insulating properties of these surfaces. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) offers extremely high spatial resolution (less than one ångström) and the ability to provide systematic information from both real and reciprocal space. However, very few TEM studies have been carried out on surfaces because the information from the bulk dominates the very weak signals originating from surfaces. Here we report an experimental approach to extract surface information effectively from a thickness series of electron energy-loss spectra containing different weights of surface signals, using a wedge-shaped sample. Using the (001) surface of the technologically important compound strontium titanate, SrTiO(3) (refs 4-6), as a model system for validation, our method shows that surface spectra are sensitive to the atomic reconstruction and indicate bonding and crystal-field changes surrounding the surface Ti cations. Very good agreement can be achieved between the experimental surface spectra and crystal-field multiplet calculations based on the proposed atomic surface structure optimized by density functional calculations. The distorted TiO(6-x) units indicated by the proposed model can be viewed directly in our high-resolution scanning TEM images. We suggest that this approach be used as a general method to extract valuable spectroscopic information from surface atoms in parallel with high-resolution images in TEM.

PMID:
23051749
DOI:
10.1038/nature11563

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